How Often Do You Water Eucalyptus? (Tips To Prevent Overwatering & Underwatering)

Eucalyptus derives from the Myrtaceae family which means is highly adaptable. I’m saying this because very few regions can grow this plant. The growing location of eucalyptus has little or no rain at all, plus it’s too dry. So, forgetting to water this plant doesn’t seem like a big deal.

Did you know that it takes 2 years for eucalyptus to grow and establish itself fully? The roots grow just like slow motion in movies and open out to a great extent all around the trunk. 

Eucalyptus grows in a tree form and can reach between 150-180 ft. in height, so to plant in the garden and maintenance seems a little bit harder than usual plants. Thankfully, you can plant this aromatic plant in the pot just for eye-pleasing and health benefits. 

The scent is another nice characteristic, actually, I’m not into essential oils especially when it comes to putting them on the skin, but this one hits different, to be honest, I would gladly mix my coconut oil with this plant and put it on my face. 

How Often Do You Water Eucalyptus?

Eucalyptus grows in extremely hot weather, so the frequency of watering should be the least of your concerns. I would recommend watering between 7-21 days, you can postpone it even more if the soil isn’t dried up. 

For potted eucalyptus, the watering process changes, during Summer (June, July, and August) the plant can dry out pretty quickly, when I say quickly I mean within 1 day. It would be best to soak in water every day, and picking the well-drainage is the key. In other seasons, gradually decrease the amount of water.

How Much Water Eucalyptus Need?

Eucalyptus trees typically tolerate drought. beyond everything, their homeland is Australia, which is incredibly hot.

Nevertheless, every plant in a container will lose moisture far more quickly than those in big garden beds you place on the ground. Therefore, when you water the potting soil, you want to establish that complete damping is definitely so.

Deep soaking is a must, and most importantly it needs to reach the root entirely. 

For newly-planted and young eucalyptus trees, you need to add between 1 or 2 gallons of water per day (during extremely hot days) if you use sandy soil. As you know sandy soil evaporates water more than other types of soil. Additionally, the plant may require an irrigating system for everyday use especially if the full sun is in question. 

The ideal watering time is either early in the morning or in the afternoon. Avoid midday watering because the cooler temperatures in the morning/afternoon will bring down water evaporation.

Water eucalyptus slowly, so when the soil is dry soil becomes softer, plus water can easily pass through and reach the roots. 

Fun Fact: Eucalyptus tree leaves fall off in order to conserve moisture and recover from underwatering problem much faster. Leaves evaporate water which can make the tree dry up completely. It’s like some sort of defense mechanism against insufficient watering. 

Overwatering & Underwatering Eucalyptus?

Overwatering

Overwatering eucalyptus is risky, plus it would be important to what kind of eucalyptus you own, if it’s preissiana type, the least amount of water is needed, but if you own deglupta, moderate watering will be all right.

Yellow leaves are a sign of excessive humidity and overwatering. If you spot any, slowly and gently eliminate those yellowish dead leaves and decrease the frequency of watering. Imagine this plant can survive the burning Australian environment, let alone other regions.

Underwatering

Just because it tolerates drought, eucalyptus still needs proper watering predominantly when it is planted in a pot indoors. 

The soil in a pot loses moisture very quickly in comparison to when it is planted in the ground. The tip of the leaves turns yellow in most cases.

A better solution would be to water eucalyptus when 2 inches on the top of the soil get dry. Keep in mind that location is important, it will tell you how much and how frequently should you water the plant. 

Eucalyptus Plant Care

Brown leaves can be a headache, and if the bark begins to turn between red and brown, you may be dealing with a serious issue. This can indicate a condition like a root rot, collar rot, or crown rot.

As for the remedy I can recommend neem oil to treat these problems. Try washing the leaves with a bar of basic hand soap and water if you notice the troublemaker bugs and pests on the plant.

If the eucalyptus is planted on the ground, full sun is a must for healthy growth. Although, when it’s planted in the pot, it dries out quickly and you should give the plant approximately 2 hours of shade per day. For indoors, place it somewhere where it catches light or when possible in direct sunlight to remind the real habitat.  

Using fertilizer every few weeks throughout the growing season can grow content and healthy eucalyptus. Use a low nitrogen, phosphorous, and high potassium fertilizer (check for 10-30-10).  

Are Eucalyptus Plants Toxic?

Eucalyptus takes part in essential oil and is used in many skincare products where you can in every over-the-counter drugstore, but the plant can be toxic if it has direct contact with skin. So, keep the pets and children away from the eucalyptus oil.

A Brief Recap

To sum up the article, the eucalyptus needs 1 or 2 gallons of water per day in peak heat and if it’s young and newly planted. Established types will be good with 7-21 days of watering. Their homeland is a high-temperature place, therefore it can withstand water. It would be ideal to water when the soil is 2 inches dry, otherwise postpone it.

It is such a beautiful plant to grow indoors or outdoors, but know that potted versions need more watering than the ground-planted ones. 

Further Reading

Since you were interested in this topic, sure thing watering other beautiful plants will catch your attention. It wouldn’t take more than 5 minutes to go through the frequency of watering snake plant, or the succulent family member aloe vera needs the top or bottom watering.

In doubt about what to plant next, find out how many fruits you will get from a single cantaloupe plant or how many sweet potatoes per plant to expect.

 

 

Ella Holmes

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